Benfotiamine Side Effects

benfotiamine side effectsAre there any dangers or side effects when you take benfotiamine? The truth is, not really. This is backed by decades of science and research.

But, there are a few instances you should be aware of when taking this manufactured form of vitamin B1, that may cause problems for certain individuals.

The health benefits of benfotiamine are such that almost everyone who is thiamine deficient, could, or should take it to avert ill health. You should definitely add this supplement, if you have neurological problems, or if you suffer from malnutrition!

Thiamine deficiency can even lead to metabolic coma.

Who Can Benfotiamine Help?

If you, or you know someone who suffers with loss of cognitive brain health, muscle soreness, or poor digestion, benfotiamine can help, because this might signify being deficient in thiamine.

Diabetics generally suffer from vitmain B1 deficiency, so benfotiamine can also help people with diabetes, or even to help prevent the disease in the first place.

It is in lipid form, which means that it metabolizes significantly more rapid in the body, releasing generous levels of thiamine pyrophosphate (the active form of thiamine), compared to thiamine hydrochloride.

Benfotiamine is Safe When Taken Appropriate Doses

Medical literature indicates that taken in appropriate amounts benfotiamine is very safe.

It has no reported interactions with food, other vitamins or prescription drugs, according to Dr. Michael Brownlee, a benfotiamine researcher at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

Benfotiamine has been licenced for use in Germany for over a decade without any major side effect being reported according to his report. Under the supervision of a healthcare provider, prescription thiamine shots are also FDA approved.

The European Food and Safety Authority reports that no adverse side effect have been reported for benfotiamine based on human clinical studies for dosage of 40 to 400 mg per day, used for three to twelve weeks.

Who Should Avoid Taking Benfotiamine?

To date there is only one group of individuals who need to exercise caution when using benfotiamine, and these are people with solid tumour cancers. Cancer cells use thiamine to make a group of enzymes called transketolases, which use the sugar in cells as fuel without any oxygen.

This allows the cancer cells to go undetected by the human immune system while they deprive healthy neighbouring cells of nutrients. In other words, thiamine can help the spread of cancer. But, benfotiamine (or any other form of thiamine) does not cause any cancer, to be clear.

15 thoughts on “Benfotiamine Side Effects”

  1. David Bevington

    Dear Andy: I am 80, a pastor for 54 years and still actively working in a church. I have idiopathic peripheral neuropathy, and it is taking a toll on my system. It is affecting my digestive system, causing loss of bladder control to the extent that I do not have the urge to urinate until it is almost too late. If I don’t find a bathroom soon after I get the urge, I leak and can wet my pants. Constipation is the other effect.
    My feet and legs up to my knees are constantly tingling, and there is loss of sensation in my toes and fingers. I keep my fingers active by playing piano nightly at a local nursing home. I used to walk a mile a day, but can’t do that any more. My balance has been effected. A combination of L5 disk and other back problems makes my standing for more than 5 minutes a problem. I need to lean on something to keep my balance.
    I don’t want to give up pastoring, but if things continue to go downhill, I can see that happening in the near future.
    I keep exercising my feet, but am very cautious when i drive my car.
    I have a long list of meds, which i won’t share at present, but among them are prednisone (in inhaler form and 5 mg every other day), and Lyrica. The lyrica is taken at breakfast and supper time. Both the Lyrica and Levothyroxin I take have side effects on sexual performance.
    I have read that Benfotiamine could be helpful. What is the dosage and can I take this supplement continually or for a short period of time?

    1. Hi David, and thank you for your contact.

      Did you read our article on the benfotiamine benefits? Neuropathy symptoms can be helped with this form of B1, but as for the dosage in your particular case, I would not like to suggest one. The only real side effect of benfotiamine would be if you had a solid tumor cancer, then in this case, you should not take it.

      I also believe serrapeptase could help you David. You could take it with benfotiamine. It’s not listed on our product page, but if you click the benfotiamine link or image on that page, and then search for it on the buy page, you will find out more. Or, I can email you a direct link, just let me know.

      Take good care of yourself.

      Andy

  2. David Bevington

    Thanks for the very prompt reply. I will try Benfotiamine, but I am hesitant to try Serrapeptase. I have chronic asthma, and I have been hospitalized several times this year with pneumonia. I found this side effect of Serrapeptase: increased risk of infection of the lung and pneumonia when using Serrapeptase. Your comments would be appreciated. Dave Bevington

  3. Barbara Tarkington

    I am currently in remission from colon cancer. I have neuropathy from taking chemotherapy. Can I safely take benfotiamine?

    1. Reading through my research notes, and I don’t think thiamine in any form is wise Barbara. But, please do further research.

      Thanks for reaching out, I wish you the best of health.

      Andy

  4. Miss Lyn Nichols

    Hi Andy,
    I have a damaged nerve right across my buttocks from a laminectomy operation. The nerve was stuck to the bulge and the surgeon prised it off instead of leaving a sliver of the nerve on the bulge and not causing me damage. I have had 5 years of hell. Can’t sit at all. Do you think benfotiamine may help me. I’m on gabapentin, co-codamol, amitriptyline and a small dose of diazepam. I should love to be able to reduce my tablets. Everything I seem to try flares the nerve up. What’s your advice please I should really appreciate it.
    Thank you

  5. Hi Andy, I was just diagnosed with cardiac amyloidosis. I read that benfotiamine may be helpful in slowing progression. What do you think?

  6. SARAH K. WYGANT

    I HAVE BEEN ON WARFARIN SINCE NOVEMBER OF 2017 WHEN A-FIB WAS DISCOVERED. I HAVE SEVERE NEUROPATHY AFTER HAVING LUMBAR SPINAL FUSION JULY OF 2016. I DID NOT HAVE ANY NEUROPATHY BEFORE THE SURGERY BUT I KNOW IT IS ONE OF THE RISKS OF THIS SURGERY. CAN I TAKE 300MGS OF BENFOTIAMINE DAILY? I TAKE 50MGS OF ALL THE RIGHT B VITAMIN EACH DAY. PLUS AN EXTRA 50 MGS OF VIT B6. WILL TAKING 300 MGS OF BENFOTIAMINE HURT THE B VITAMIN BALANCE OF ALL THE OTHER B VITAMINS AT SMALLER DOSES? I TAKE 5MG OF WARFARIN SIX DAYS OF THE WEEK. MY DOCTOR IS NOT A FAN OF EXCESS VITAMINS BUT I CAN NOT TAKE ANY ASPIRIN OR ALEVE, ONLY TYLENOL FOR PAIN

    1. Hi Sarah, thanks for your message. I don’t have anything in my research to answer you honestly I’m sorry. Warfarin is a dangerous one, and I don’t know if you should take/avoid thiamine in this case.

  7. I have been interested in a number of nootropics and other products that would be able to help with our cognitive health and state. Thank you for the information on Benfotiamine, as well.

  8. I heard Benfotiamine might help stop the progression of
    ARM; 150 mg x 2 day. Is this safe for a person who has
    a sensitivity to sulfites, since thiamine is a sulfited vitamin.

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